VR World

G.Skill Launches Ripjaws 4 DDR4 Memory Clocked At 3333 MHz

GSkill 3333MHz

Although there are several DDR4 kits available for X99 motherboards, most modules are clocked at 2133 MHz and 2400 MHz. G.Skill is looking to remedy that with the launch of its latest memory modules, which are clocked at 3333 MHz. Dubbed Ripjaws 4, G.Skill is looking to cater to the enthusiast segment with these modules, which will be available in quad-channel variants (4x4GB). In addition to the 3333 MHz modules, G.Skill is also launching slightly lesser clocked 3300 MHz and 3200 MHz kits in 16 GB (4x4GB) configurations. The modules feature a CL timings of 16-16-16-36, which comes out to a latency of 9.6 nanoseconds.


Hardware, Memory & Storage Space, VR World

Kingston Launches HyperX Savage Memory Modules


Kingston has launched new memory modules in the HyperX Savage line. The modules are targeted at the enthusiast segment and will be replacing HyperX’s mid-tier Genesis line. Featuring a bright red heatspreader cast out of aluminium, the Savage line of memory modules are designed to offer high performance and reliability. With dimensions of 133.35 mm x 32.8 mm, the modules are fairly low profile and are ideal in builds that feature large CPU coolers like the Noctua NH-D15. We first saw this memory back in Taipei at Computex 2014 and were given the low-down on the company’s efforts to re-brand their three different tiers of memory into


Enterprise, Hardware

SK.Hynix Enables 1TB of Processor Memory with a 128GB DDR4 Module


Back in 2003, AMD introduced the Opteron processor, world’s first 64-bit x86 processor capable of addressing more than 4GB of memory (32-bit) – no less than massive 1TB of memory, courtesy of its 40-bit allocation table. Processors of today are capable of addressing up to 8TB of SDRAM memory thanks to extended (46-bit) allocation table. However, until now, finding a high-capacity memory module with 32GB density was as rare as finding hen’s teeth and usually you would pay top dollar for it. Upcoming 20nm manufacturing process enabled the creation of ultra-dense memory modules and with SK.Hynix launching its 20nm 8Gbit memory chip, there was no